Exhibition ‘Egypt of Glory: Art from the Nile Valley’

At the first major exhibition of ancient Egyptian art in Estonia, thousands of years old objects from one of the world's most important collections of ancient Egypt – the Museo Egizio (Egyptian Museum) in Turin, Italy, are exhibited. Simultaneously with the exhibition at the Kumu Art Museum, the treasures of the Egyptian Museum are also on display at the Amos Rex Art Museum in Helsinki. The large-scale joint project of the three museums is a unique opportunity to discover ancient Egypt without traveling far.
The Kumu exhibition features 200 items from the rich heritage of the land of Pharaohs. These include sarcophagi, mummies, magical amulets, various tombstones, and sculptures. On the one hand, the objects speak of the world of an ancient Egyptian, on the other hand, each is a work of art in its own right.
Although the language at the time did not include the word 'art', the surrounding environment was actively depicted. Ancient Egyptians' perceptions of art differed significantly from modern ones. The idea of art as an independent creative form of expression was unknown. Art fulfilled a magical purpose for them, giving form to what they wanted to bring to life. According to the Egyptians, a shape made from a stone block was as alive and important as the person it represented. Thus, on the one hand, artists were craftsmen, on the other hand, they belonged to the mysterious sphere of magic and religion. Today, we can generalise that one of the most characteristic features of ancient Egyptian art was the rigid adherence to rules. The rules applied to both the way of depiction and the content when creating all works of art. The repetition of the scenes of Pharaohs destroying enemies, the dead embracing each other, or offering sacrifices to the gods did not mean a lack of imagination, but the observance of ideological and religious rules.
Through seven sub-themes, the exhibition tells the story of Pharaohs' life and faith in eternity, the depiction of people, animals, and gods in different ways and purposes, and hieroglyphs as an art form and applied art. In addition, the exhibition gives an idea of the connections of Estonians with Ancient Egypt, moving forward to the fascination with 19th century Egypt, which also brought Egyptian antiquities to our museum collections.

At the first major exhibition of ancient Egyptian art in Estonia, thousands of years old objects from one of the world's most important collections of ancient Egypt – the Museo Egizio (Egyptian Museum) in Turin, Italy, are exhibited. Simultaneousl

Times and prices
Kesklinna linnaosa, Kumu Kunstimuuseum

Egypt of Glory: Art from the Nile Valley

18.01 - 21.03.2021
Tuesday–wednesday, friday–sunday: 10:00 - 18:00
Thursday 10:00 - 20:00
Monday closed

Adult: 10 €
Discounted ticket: 7 €
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