Kavastu raft

In 1899, W. Wulff, the landlord of Kavastu, ordered that there be a raft to make it easier to cross River Emajõgi. In 1983, the chain of the raft broke, the raft disappeared downstream, and the flywheel sunk to the bottom of the river. In 1999, the century-old tradition was brought back to life; the original flywheel was lifted from the river basin and put to work again.
The raft, unique in Europe, has a more than a century-old hand-operated mechanism by which the raftman helps you to the other shore.

Often, visitors want to operate the flywheel themselves. The raft is popular with both visitors coming by car or on foot as well as cyclists who explore Southern Estonia.

In 1899, W. Wulff, the landlord of Kavastu, ordered that there be a raft to make it easier to cross River Emajõgi. In 1983, the chain of the raft broke, the raft disappeared downstream, and the flywheel sunk to the bottom of the river. In 1999, th

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